Photo 14 Dec 3,377 notes anthonygrey:

So I made a thing

anthonygrey:

So I made a thing

Photo 22 Jun 3 notes #shed #red #green #Buttercups #mine

#shed #red #green #Buttercups #mine

Photo 16 Jun 31 notes weareallprostitutesandjunkies:

Kirk and Spock have lunch

weareallprostitutesandjunkies:

Kirk and Spock have lunch

Photo 14 Jun 2 notes #glasgow #clouds #grass #filter #gray

#glasgow #clouds #grass #filter #gray

Photo 12 Jun #spongebob #eyes #cartoon #asda

#spongebob #eyes #cartoon #asda

Photo 12 Jun 874 notes theoceanrolls:

The Atlantic Road (by Jaime Pérez)

theoceanrolls:

The Atlantic Road (by Jaime Pérez)

Photo 11 Jun 89 notes futurescope:

DNA ‘Fog’ Marks Criminals Invisibly for Later ID
From Discovery:

For years banks have rigged bags of money with exploding dye packs, which show the cash was stolen and mark the thief. Now DNA can do the same job — without the suspect being aware of it.
This isn’t using the criminal’s own DNA to track him or her — it’s engineered, artificial gene sequences that act like bar codes. They can be applied to goods or people to uniquely identify them, and be made to glow under certain kinds of light or be read by swabbing them and reading the sequence chemically.
DNA marking is already being used on objects for tracking by law enforcement agencies in the United States and the U.K.
The latest version of the technology comes from Stony Brook, N.Y.-based Applied DNA Sciences. It’s called “DNA Fog.” The device fills a room with smoke to confuse an intruder. The smoke isn’t just to make it hard for the person to see; it also contains droplets loaded with DNA. If the person escapes, they are still covered with it, and it’s invisible.

Bloomberg Businessweek has a nice Infocomic:

[read more]

futurescope:

DNA ‘Fog’ Marks Criminals Invisibly for Later ID

From Discovery:

For years banks have rigged bags of money with exploding dye packs, which show the cash was stolen and mark the thief. Now DNA can do the same job — without the suspect being aware of it.

This isn’t using the criminal’s own DNA to track him or her — it’s engineered, artificial gene sequences that act like bar codes. They can be applied to goods or people to uniquely identify them, and be made to glow under certain kinds of light or be read by swabbing them and reading the sequence chemically.

DNA marking is already being used on objects for tracking by law enforcement agencies in the United States and the U.K.

The latest version of the technology comes from Stony Brook, N.Y.-based Applied DNA Sciences. It’s called “DNA Fog.” The device fills a room with smoke to confuse an intruder. The smoke isn’t just to make it hard for the person to see; it also contains droplets loaded with DNA. If the person escapes, they are still covered with it, and it’s invisible.

Bloomberg Businessweek has a nice Infocomic:

[read more]

Photo 10 Jun 473 notes retrogasm:

Boy Wonder

retrogasm:

Boy Wonder

via Retrogasm.
Photo 10 Jun 338 notes books0977:

Publicity shot of artist Zoe Mozert painting Jane Russell (1943). Became the movie poster rendition of Russell in The Outlaw. The poster was superb and a classic of the genre.
It was rare to have publicity photographs of the work in progress. However, Howard Hughes had his own methods.

books0977:

Publicity shot of artist Zoe Mozert painting Jane Russell (1943). Became the movie poster rendition of Russell in The Outlaw. The poster was superb and a classic of the genre.

It was rare to have publicity photographs of the work in progress. However, Howard Hughes had his own methods.

Photo 10 Jun 386 notes fyeah-history:

Valentina Vladimirovna TereshkovaValentina Vladimirovna Tereshkova (Russian: Валенти́на Влади́мировна Терешко́ва; born 6 March 1937) is a retired Soviet cosmonaut and the first woman to have flown in space, having been selected from more than four hundred applicants and five finalists to pilot Vostok 6 on 16 June 1963. In order to join the Cosmonaut Corps, Tereshkova was only honorarily inducted into the Soviet Air Force and thus she also became the first civilian to fly in space.[1] During her three-day mission, she performed various tests on herself to collect data on the female body’s reaction to spaceflight.
Before being recruited as a cosmonaut, Tereshkova was a textile factory assembly worker and an amateur parachutist. After the dissolution of the first group of female cosmonauts in 1969, she became a prominent member of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union, holding various political offices. She remained politically active following the collapse of the Soviet Union and is still revered as a heroine in post-Soviet Russia.

fyeah-history:

Valentina Vladimirovna Tereshkova
Valentina Vladimirovna Tereshkova (Russian: Валенти́на Влади́мировна Терешко́ва; born 6 March 1937) is a retired Soviet cosmonaut and the first woman to have flown in space, having been selected from more than four hundred applicants and five finalists to pilot Vostok 6 on 16 June 1963. In order to join the Cosmonaut Corps, Tereshkova was only honorarily inducted into the Soviet Air Force and thus she also became the first civilian to fly in space.[1] During her three-day mission, she performed various tests on herself to collect data on the female body’s reaction to spaceflight.

Before being recruited as a cosmonaut, Tereshkova was a textile factory assembly worker and an amateur parachutist. After the dissolution of the first group of female cosmonauts in 1969, she became a prominent member of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union, holding various political offices. She remained politically active following the collapse of the Soviet Union and is still revered as a heroine in post-Soviet Russia.


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